Tag Archives: matt bomer

#PRIDE50 - WATCH: Matt Bomer Sings "People Like Us" from Doom Patrol - VIDEO

#PRIDE50 – WATCH: Matt Bomer Sings “People Like Us” from Doom Patrol – VIDEO

Hey everybody loses it
Everybody wants to throw it all away sometimes
And hey, yeah I know what you’re going through
Don’t let it get the best of you, you’ll make it out alive
Oh, people like us we’ve gotta stick together
Keep your head up, nothing lasts forever
Here’s to the damned to the lost and forgotten
It’s hard to get high when you’re living on the bottom

WATCH: Matt Bomer Plays Gay Superhero in DC's "Doom Patrol" Series

WATCH: Matt Bomer Plays Gay Superhero in DC’s “Doom Patrol” Series

Doom Patrol — the second series to debut on DC Comics streaming service follows a group of strange, misfit heroes premiered yesterday and the reviews are pretty damn good.

“More TV superheroes, just what the world needs. Have you hung yourself yet?” the unseen narrator (Alan Tudyk) sneers in the opening seconds of this unabashedly nihilistic and meta blend of superhero dramatics and absurdist comedy.

As this extended trailer below reveals, the team is brought together by a man named Niles Caulder aka The Chief (Timothy Dalton).

The team consists of Robotman aka Cliff Steele (Brendan Fraser), Negative Man aka Larry Trainor (Matt Bomer), Elasti-Woman aka Rita Farr (April Bowbly), and Crazy Jane (Diane Guerrero).

The trailer gives brief synopses of our heroes’ backstories, such as Matt Bomer’s character Larry, who was a military man having an illicit gay affair behind his wife’s back before his accident.

The Doom Patrol first appeared in DC Comics in 1963.

Trans-Activist Demand Boycott Of Matt Bomer's Upcoming Movie "Anything" - FULL Trailer

Trans-Activist Demand Boycott Of Matt Bomer’s Upcoming Movie “Anything” – FULL Trailer

Trans-activist are up in arms over Matt Bomer’s newest film, Anything, in which he plays Freda Von Rhenburg, a trans woman who’s also a sex worker.

Based on a play of the same name, the film follows a suicidal widower (John Carroll Lynch) who moves to Los Angeles and forms an unlikely friendship with a transgender sex worker (Matt Bomer).

Trans Narratives, an organization that helps trans people to share their stories, has now called for a boycott

An admin of the page wrote:: “As a trans woman, I know from personal experience that many gay men believe that trans women are really gay men who refuse to deal with being gay men. I’ve been told this to my face. “So perhaps the gay men who insist on ‘gay-splaining’ that Matt Bomer should be playing a trans woman just can’t get over the notion that trans women are in fact women, not gay men.”

Jen Richards a trans-actress alleges that she was told that she doesn’t look transgender enough to play a transgender person on film. (Although according to producer- Mark Ruffalo- no one auditioned for the part- he had just worked with Bomer and offered him the part first.)

“They said you don’t look trans enough,” my agent told me over the phone, “What the hell does that mean?”

I laughed. I was finally joining the club that included my friends Angelica Ross, Trace Lysette, Rain Valdez, Jamie Clayton, and Alexandra Grey.

“It means that they want the audience to know the character is trans just by looking at her,” I explained, “And in their mind that means a guy in a wig.”

“Dear @MarkRuffalo & @MattBomer: if you release this movie, it will directly lead to violence against already at risk women,” she added.

But many don’t agree with the boycott:

“What people never seem to understand re: issues like this is that audiences will go to see Matt Bomer in a role like this rather than an unknown transgender actor or actress.” Said one commenter.  “No studio is going to shell out millions of dollars to make a film that that will tank because no one will see it. Are they protesting to keep people from seeing the film? If so, they’re cutting off their noses to spite their faces. America is still adjusting to the idea of transgender people, it’s films like this that will slowly clear the way for real transgender actors to finally he recognized.”

You can watch the trailer for Anything below and sound off in the comments with your own opinions.

 

Matt Bomer Buys Out Hometown Texas Movie Theater for the Community to See Love, Simon

Matt Bomer Buys Out Hometown Texas Movie Theater for the Community to See “Love, Simon”

Spring, Texas native, and openly gay actor Matt Bomer, has bought out a screening of the film Love, Simon so that people in his hometown can see the gay coming-of-age story.

In an Instagram post Thursday, Bomer announced that he and his husband, Simon Halls, had bought out the 4 p.m. showing at the AMC Spring, Texas 10.

Bomer, who made his stage debut at Houston’s Alley Theatre in 1995, grew up in a conservative Christian home and struggled to come out to his parents.

One commenter called Bomer’s buyout “a beautiful gesture that will produce openness in the hearts and minds of those who will see this film.”

“I know how much pain you have gone through in your adolescence and I hope that many guys in the future do not have to do the same,” the commenter wrote.

Bomer will make his Broadway debut in “The Boys in the Band,” a new revival of the landmark 1968 drama to be directed by Joe Mantello with a cast that includes Jim Parsons, Zachary Quinto and Andrew Rannells.

BROADWAY – WATCH: “Talking About The Boys in the Band” – Broadway Cast Discusses Historic Show (VIDEO)

Jim Parsons, Zachary Quinto, Matt Bomer, Andrew Rannells, Tuc Watkins, and the rest of the cast of the upcoming Broadway production of Matt Crowley’s The Boys in the Band got together for a photo shoot and shot a featurette talking about the play’s significance and what it means today.

From the producers about the play:

“The significance of The Boys in the Band cannot be underestimated.  In 1968, Mart Crowley made theatrical history by giving voice to gay men onstage, in this uncompromising, blisteringly honest, and wickedly funny play,” said Ryan Murphy. “The play was groundbreaking in its exploration of how gay men treated each other and how they were made to feel about themselves.  And while some attitudes have thankfully shifted, it’s important to be reminded of what we have overcome and how much further we still have to go.”

David Stone adds, “Everything has changed.  And nothing has changed.”

Tickets for the 15-week revival are on sale now via Telecharge

Broadway’s The Boys in the Band Revival to Star Jim Parsons, Zachary Quinto, Andrew Rannells, and Matt Bomer

 

Matt Crowley’s  groundbreaking 1968 play”The Boys in the Band” will be revived for a limited Broadway engagement for it’s 50th Anniversary and will be directed by two-time Tony winner Joe Mantello. and starring five openly gay actors: Jim Parsons, Zachary Quinto, Andrew Rannells, Matt Bomer, and  Tuc Watkins.

The cast will also include Tony nominee Robin De Jesús as Emory, Brian Hutchison as Alan, and Michael Benjamin Washington as Bernard. The role of Cowboy remains to be cast.

Not to spoil the 50 year  old plot line but in The Boys in the Band, an affluent, thirty-year-old gay man named Michael has invited a number of his homosexual friends to his stylish New York City apartment for a birthday party honoring their gay Jewish friend, Harold. The group includes Donald; Michael’s present lover; Emory, a portrait of the effeminate gay stereotype; Hank, once married and the father of two children but now living with Larry; Bernard, a gay black man; and a male prostitute who is Emory’s birthday gift to Harold. Michael’s former college friend, Alan, who is married and hostile toward homosexuals, crashes this party. Alan soon recognizes the stereotypical Emory as a homosexual, is offended by his behavior, and punches him; however, Alan is later surprised to discover that the others also are gay, especially Hank, who Alan thinks is heterosexual. The action of the play culminates in a party game that Michael designs; each guest must telephone the one person he truly believes he has loved and confess his deepest feelings. Michael intends for this game to reveal Alan’s latent homosexuality, but Alan’s telephone call goes to his wife. The play ends with Harold characterizing Michael as a gay man consumed by self-loathing.

The production marks The Boys in the Band’s Broadway premiere.  Originally scheduled to run for five performances at a small Off-Broadway venue, the play became an overnight sensation, and—after transferring to a bigger theatre—ran for over 1,000 performances. The show went on to have an acclaimed run in London and was adapted into a film by William Friedkin in 1970. But it never played on Broadway.

The TBITB is scheduled to play the Booth Theatre April 30–August 12, 2018.

The production is being produced by Ryan Murphy and veteran Broadway producer David Stone.

Source: Playbill.com

 

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Matt Bomer To Star In HBO Biopic About The Tragic Life Of Closeted Gay Movie Star Montgomery Clift

Matt Bomer Monty Clift

 

Matt Bomer is soon to return to HBO in the premium cable network’s biopic “Monty Clift”.

 Bomer, an openly gay man and heartrob to many men and women alike  won critical praise for his work in HBO’s The Normal Heart.  Ira Sachs and Mauricio Zachariasto to rewrite the script originally penned by Christopher Lovick that centers on the complicated life and hidden gay life of Clift (Bomer), who finds himself deeply involved with a young Elizabeth Taylor following the filming of A Place in the Sun.

Via Deadline Hollywood

“To see the kind of intense vulnerability and realism that he brought to his work at a time when that was not the style—it’s profound,” Bomer said in an interview last year. “He knew everything he was feeling inside—or if he didn’t, you wondered, why was he feeling that when the scene was this? To get to portray someone who was so formative to me as an artist would be terrifying and daunting and thrilling.

Clift’s performance in A Place in the Sun is regarded as one of his signature method acting performances. He worked extensively on his character and was again nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actor. For his character’s scenes in jail, Clift spent a night in a real state prison. He also refused to go along with director George Stevens’ suggestion that he do “something amazing” on his character’s walk to the electric chair. Instead, he walked to his death with a natural, depressed facial expression.   Charlie Chaplin called the movie “the greatest movie made about America.” The film received added media attention due to the rumors that Clift and Taylor were “dating” in real life. They were billed as “the most beautiful couple in Hollywood.” Many critics still call Clift and Taylor “the most beautiful Hollywood movie couple of all time.”

On the evening of May 12, 1956, while filming Raintree County, Clift was involved in a serious auto accident when he smashed his car into a telephone pole after leaving a dinner party at the Beverly Hills home of his now close friend Elizabeth Taylor and her second husband, Michael Wilding. Alerted by friend Kevin McCarthy, who witnessed the accident, Taylor raced to Clift’s side, manually pulling a tooth out of his tongue as he had begun to choke on it. He suffered a broken jaw and nose, a fractured sinus, and several facial lacerations which required plastic surgery

Although the results of Clift’s plastic surgeries were remarkable for the time, there were noticeable differences in his appearance, particularly the right side of his face. The pain of the accident led him to rely on alcohol and pills for relief, as he had done after an earlier bout with dysentery left him with chronic intestinal problems. As a result, Clift’s health and physical appearance deteriorated considerably from then until his death.

Elizabeth Taylor was a significant figure in his life. He met her when she was supposed to be his date at the premiere for The Heiress. They appeared together in A Place in the Sun, where, in their romantic scenes, they received considerable acclaim for their naturalness and their appearance. Clift and Taylor appeared together again in Raintree County and Suddenly, Last Summer.

Clift never physically or emotionally recovered from his car accident. His post-accident career has been referred to as the “longest suicide in Hollywood history””.   Because of his alleged subsequent abuse of painkillers and alcohol.  He began to behave erratically in public, which embarrassed his friends, including Kevin McCarthy and Jack Larson. Nevertheless, Clift continued to work over the next ten years.

But despite earning a nomination for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for portraying Rudolph Peterson, a victim of forced sterilization at the hands of Nazi authorities in the Stanley Kramer film Judgment at Nuremberg Monty was considered unemployable in the mid 1960s, Taylor put her salary for the film on the line as insurance, in order to have Clift cast as her co-star in Reflections in a Golden Eye.

Clift also had a relationship with legendary choreographer Jerome Robbins

Clift and Taylor remained good friends..

Montgomery Clift died on on July 22, 1966.  The autopsy report cited the cause of death as a heart attack brought on by “occlusive coronary artery disease”

 

Just So You Know, There Is No Criteria To Coming Out

gaygay

As of late, there has been so much discussion to coming out of the closet. It started off as a reaction to Jodie Foster’s speech at the Golden Globes and progressed into a heated, bitter debate. In the mist of all this, a notion that there is some sort of criteria you have to meet in order to live up to everyone else’s standards. Imagine that, the LGBT community setting another set of standards we have to meet in order to have an adequate coming out story.

Never mind the fact that these criteria negate the entire process of others looking to come out. Because when you have finally reached the point and admit to yourself that you’re gay, there’s a breadth of emotion to the process. Because it is a process.

I vividly remember my process. It began with…

…wondering first and foremost would those that I love most would support me. Petrified to discover if their love is conditional on you being a certain way. …beginning to speculate how everyone else in this world will treat you because of it. …it’s a process…with each person you tell, it feels freeing and terrifying at the same time because they know something about you so meaningful that they can try to use that against you. …I’m beginning to wonder if this was even worth it.

…Fear the fact that I will always have to be aware of my surroundings because of either my race or because I’m gay because someone may try to harm me because of it. I can be fired for being gay. I should just suppress and not talk about it to anyone when I get a job  …constantly asking myself if/when people are going to stop talking about this. …it’s a process …Was coming out really important. Maybe, just maybe I was wrong to come out in the first place. …becoming so sick and tired of every damn thought and action feeling like it is a result of me being gay.

…so sick of my straight friends asking if I’m checking them out. There’s so much hassle to this. I’m still Sly …it’s a process…I keep staring off into the distance wondering why God made me this way and if this notion of him believing that I am a sinner for being gay will make him take out his vengeful wrath upon me to bring this cure through prayer or strike me down as a result of questioning his infinite way. …surprised by how you deal with the same feelings when you come out are the same as when you’re in the closet…. always angry. …deeply sad. …feeling so alone. …scared. …I cannot and will not give up no matter what.

..just keep going because this is a process…learning about a friend going through the same process of coming out and heard he ended his life because he was too afraid to face it. have to do everything in my power to ensure I do not share the same fate …I am more determined than ever to embrace this no matter what. I don’t care what anyone else says because I’m not living for them. there is nothing wrong with being gay. Gay. …I’ve accepted this in due part to me being an African American. because I have had to accept the persecution of others because I’m an African American male, looked down upon no matter how smart I am, no matter how helpful and kind I treat others. But that is not my fault because there is nothing wrong with being an African American or being gay. One of the biggest reasons that I am so thankful to be an African American is that it helped me not only accept, but also love being gay. I love being gay. I love me.  

Everything you see that’s italicized was my process as it was written down in my journal entries over eight years ago.  Not everyone’s experiences, thoughts, or anything else associated with this process are the same. There’s most likely things and emotions you recognize from my experience and some others that you don’t. No two people are the same and we don’t process any situation or event is the same. But we all went through this life changing event that profoundly affected us. I’m not famous and probably will never reach that status. I’m not trying to be so I do not know all the pros and cons to having money and being privileged. Money can’t make everything go away.

But I do know that money will not take away this process from happening. Why? Because of my race. Because even though  growing up in a -multi-ethnic, multi-religion multi-everything else military town I still face racism. I still face homophobia. Throwing money at race didn’t make those issues go away from James Earl Jones or Denzel Washington and why would it? People will still judge them and me based solely on the color of my skin. When you’re gay, you’re presented with the similar discriminatory issues. I’m not asking them to pick up and campaign against these issues. If I want those changes to happen, I have to do more to make it happen.

Privilege continues to come up in these conversations yet many fail to see the advantages provided to them each and every day because of their race. Do you know what it’s like to have to deal with both racism and homophobia at the same time? I could argue quite effectively how that gives gay Caucasian men privilege over me or any other ethnic minority LGBT member of this community.  So let’s talk about that privilege.

Should we talk about the both covert and blatant racism in the LGBT community, especially among gay men that makes it harder to come out and be welcomed in this community? That when you try to discuss this with certain LGBT leaders that they have the gall to say you’re playing a race card? The very ignorant belief that  you can’t be racist because you’re gay is a sad, yet common belief. You see, this notion of privilege is subjective at best. Formed by our own opinion and experiences, but not always based in fact. So maybe when you talk about other’s privilege you should think about your own and consider how that ideology is a part of the problem.

I’ve been ranting against this idea of privilege and that there’s a right/wrong way to come out nonstop. When I first began writing this two days ago it was filled with evidence of how many of these activists and bloggers are so hypocritical on this topic (and I may still write it as it needs to be addressed) because I am furious that this standard of coming out is expected instead of welcoming everyone no matter what. We all know what that’s like to be treated differently so why are we trying to employ this elitist, homogeneous ideal?

Would I love to see everyone that comes out be an activist as it helps promote and advance the cause? Of course but I don’t see these people that are condemning Jodie Foster doing the same to Matt Dallas. Frank Ocean, Victor Garber, Jim Parsons, Matt Bomer, Zachary Quinto or Anderson Cooper for the way they came out. When will they be scrutinized and asked what they are doing or not doing for the LGBT community? You don’t have to be an example for everyone else. You only have to be you. So these people saying how they want things done should get busy doing the things they want to see in others themselves.

Be more of the instrument that fosters (pun intended) in what you want to see instead of wasting all this time trying to prove that you’re right and that there’s some ridiculous code of conduct to coming out. I have literally argued about this for three days now. I was so ready to get down in the mud and get mean, but then something amazing happened. I began to receive messages from all walks of life telling me of their process. I was so deeply moved by it and am forever thankful for their stories. Amazingly complex but different stories of processing coming out. That solidified even further my belief that this process of coming out is unique to each of us but we still have a process. It changes our perspective on everything.

So I began to write this the way I had always intended. To hope that my experience relates enough to the topic so we can discuss it . I will not always get it right nor will I always agree but always treat everyone with respect. And do my best to make this a community in which EVERYONE is welcome. So no, there is no criteria to coming out because we all went through something powerful and unique. No matter how a person comes out, we should welcome them. I only hope that everyone else in this community begins to do the same.