Tag Archives: gayborhood

Gay History 101 – WATCH: The Story Of “The Castro” – FULL Documentary

As many of you know a lot of my history posts tend to lean more towards New York City’s gay history mostly because that is where I hail from.  With that being said I would like to share with you a very interesting and great documentary I stumbled upon about the history of the Castro neighborhood in San Francisco.

Originally shown during the Gay and Lesbian Pride Month in 1996, The Castro is a 90-minute documentary tells the dramatic story of how a quiet corner of San Francisco became the cornerstone of a movement-an international symbol of gay liberation.

Using rare archival film and fresh contemporary footage, the story of the Castro’s transformation and history is told by the people who lived it: young and old, straight and gay. They bring to life a history ranging from the discriminatory world of the 1950s, through the flowering of “gay power,” and into the age of AIDS.

The Castro, was produced by KQED San Francisco/PBS  and won the George Foster Peabody Award, a CINE Golden Eagle Award and was   screened at numerous film festivals in the United States and abroad.

Its a must see to understand our past and why the community is so different today..

Chicago's Gay Historic "Boystown' Neighborhood Now To Called "Northalstead" To Be More Inclusive

Activists Demand Chicago’s Gay Neighborhood “Boystown” Name Be Changed To Be More Inclusive

A petition, created by local “queer” non-binary activist Devlyn Camp is demanding that the historic Chicago gay neighborhood of “Boystown” change it’s name claiming it perpetuates sexism and other discrimination in the neighborhood.

The petition posted on Change.org reads in part:

The Castro, Greenwich Village, West Hollywood, and many more. LGBTQ neighborhoods exist for all intersections of queer identity. Chicago’s is the only gendered nickname. Systemic transphobia, racism, and sexism have plagued our neighborhood for decades, and it begins at the top, with the all-male board of the Northalsted Business Alliance. It begins with the BOYSTOWN signs down our street announcing that this neighborhood is “for the boys,” though the signs hang above our diverse Legacy Walk of several LGBTQ icons in our history.”

(SNIP)

“Many of our transgender siblings must visit the Center on Halsted to utilize necessary resources. Many of them have experienced transphobia in the North Halsted area. Our LGBTQ siblings of color looking for inclusive bars have been met with racism. Many women frequenting and working in North Halsted businesses have been met with sexism. When police shut down the bars early after Pride in 2018, many on the Northalsted Business Alliance praised the police.”

Northalsted Business Alliance board said in a written statement that it had formed a committee to begin outreach to businesses and community members, with the goal of gaining “important perspective” on a possible name change.

“This process will likely take a few months, as we listen to the community feedback and engage in broad-based efforts beyond just a possible name change, but a commitment to learning how to ensure the neighborhood moves forward as an inclusive and welcoming neighborhood for all,” the statement said.

The boundaries of the neighborhood stretches from about 3100 to 3800 North Halsted. The unofficial designation of Boys Town as an area dates back 50 years to 1970’s The neighborhood has always been predominantly populated by gay men and lesbians.

At the time of this post 1300 people have signed the petition. But blowback by many who live and work in the neighborhood have been equally strong against the name change.

Do you think the name change of Boystown to something more inclusive is justified or is it really much ado about nothing?

Sound off in the comments below.

Explosion Rocks NYC’s Chelsea Neighborhood Injures 29+ – Video

Explosion Rocks NYC's Chelsea Neighborhood Injures 29+ - Video

 

An explosion rocked the New York City neighborhood of Chelsea, Saturday night, leaving more than two dozen people injured.

The cause of the blast late on Saturday in Chelsea remains unclear. Mayor Bill de Blasio described it as “intentional” but said that there were no known links to terror.

The force of the blast blew out windows and could be heard several blocks away.

Another device, reportedly a pressure cooker rigged with wires, was later found in the same neighborhood..

The explosion occurred around 9.00 pm on Saturday night.. Witnesses said people ran in all directions following the “incredibly loud” blast.

“The initial indications is this was an intentional act,” Mr de Blasio said.

But he added: “We also want to be upfront saying that there is no evidence at this point of a terror connection to this incident.”

Still, law enforcement sources told CBS News the Joint Terrorism Task Force is ramping up operations in New York.

Law enforcement officials said that the device found at the second Chelsea location appeared to be a pressure cooker attached to wiring and a mobile phone. Police said it had been removed safely.

Twenty-nine people were hurt in the explosion, including one considered seriously injured, officials said.

“This is a very dense area, the whole block is restaurants and residences and this area on a warm Saturday night is an area swarming with people,” New York City Councilman Cory Johnson stated.

Johnson, who represents the area, said that FBI and federal Homeland Security officials were on the scene, in addition to New York City police.

The NYPD investigated a possible second device, confirmed to be a pressure cooker, on 27th Street between 6th and 7th Avenues. A bomb disposal robot was deployed at the scene and the device was safely removed for further analysis, police said.

Police investigated a third suspicious package on 28th Street and 5th Ave., but it turned out to be nothing dangerous.

Meanwhile, law enforcement was already reviewing surveillance video of the area where the explosion occurred looking for clues, CBS station WCBS reported.