Tag Archives: gay horror

Happy HOMO-ween: WATCH: “Scream Queen!” Trailer – The Gay Side of A Nightmare on Elm Street

Scream, Queen My Nightmare on Elm Street Poster

 

Three decades ago young actor Mark Patton starred as Jesse Walsh, the object of Freddy Krueger’s latent desire in A Nightmare on Elm Street 2.  And for 30 years hes been paying the price.

Via Kickstarter:

This is not your typical Nightmare On Elm Street documentary. Whether you’re a horror fan or a gay advocate, Scream, Queen! has something to offer to everyone. We delve into a deeper subject of A Nightmare on Elm Street 2 that has been at the forefront for years, yet no one has fully explored. This is a story not just about Mark Patton, the star of A Nightmare On Elm Street 2, but about Hollywood’s gay subculture in the 1980s. For months we have been following Mark Patton around getting intimate accounts of how the backlash of NOES2 has deeply affected his life. From its release in 1985, fans and critics have raised an eyebrow at the not-so-subtle hints of Jesse Walsh’s sexuality. Did this create the whirlwind of questions that set the film so far apart from all the others in its series? Village Voice publication was the first to officially comment on the film’s gay subtext, releasing a landslide of both good and bad commentary from fans and critics worldwide. In 1985 being gay in Hollywood could cost you your career. Now 30 years later, Scream, Queen! is asking why?

There is no release date in place for Scream Queen yet but director Tyler Jensen revealed that the film is nearing completion.

 

Scream, Queen! My Nightmare On Elm Street – Teaser from Tyler Jensen on Vimeo.

 

Unintentionally Gay Horror Movies: Eddie the Sleepwalking Cannibal. (2012) – VIDEO

Eddie the sleepwaling cannibalDirector Ira Sachs brings us the latest in the “bromantic unintentionally gay horror genre” with his latest dark comedy, Eddie the Sleepwalking Cannibal

Thure Lindhardt is Lars, a former darling of the art scene who takes a teaching job at a tiny college in some remote, snow capped Candian town after falling on hard times. One of Lars’ new students is Eddie, a mute and big and beefy hulk of a man, who has been left homeless by a recent death. When his boss convinces Lars to take Eddie in (the film posits that he does so to impress a girl, but we know that’s not true), Lars discovers the guy is a sleepwalker, a homicidal one. The sight of Eddie’s first kill (of a wild) is horrifying but also strangely enthralling, and it inspires Lars’ best painting in years. Soon Lars is pushing Eddie to make deeper cuts to the town’s already tiny population, all for the name of art. In the process though, the two men develop a sweet and loving relationship that is makes this film at its heart a bromance between two men who don’t even realize they are falling in love. Plus, you know, there’s the bonus of gory cannibalism, a takedown of the pretentious art world, and beefy Eddie in his tighty whities hunting small town bigots in the dead of night. The director, Boris Rodriguez, calls the film “playfully malicious;” add the phrase “subtextually gay” and you got Eddie in a nutshell.