Tag Archives: cold case

Arrest Made in 1988 Cold Case Murder of American Student in Australia

Arrest Made in 1988 Cold Case Hate Crime Murder of American Student in Australia

Detectives in New South Wales, Australia have arrested and charged a man with the 1988 hate crime murder of American math scholar Scott Johnson.

The 27-year-old’s body was discovered on December 10, 1988 near Manly’s Blue Fish Point in Sydney. At the time, Johnson’s death was seen as symbolic of authorities’ willingness to overlook hate crimes in the gay community after the PhD student’s death was initially ruled a suicide.

Today, Sydney has a thriving and prominent gay community., but in the 1980’s, however, packs of young men roamed popular meeting places for gay men, intending to beat and rob them. Gay men were told to carry whistles to call for help if they were attacked.

Detectives arrested 49-year-old Scott White at Lane Cove about 8.30am on Tuesday, before a search warrant was executed at a nearby home.

Steve Johnson said in a statement that his brother symbolizes those who lost their lives to homophobic-inspired violence.

“It’s emotional for me, emotional for my family, my two sisters and brother who loved Scott dearly, my wife and three kids who never got to know their uncle,” Johnson said.

On Tuesday morning, NSW Police Commissioner Mick Fuller praised the Johnson family for their determination, which he said “inspired” his officers.

“Making that phone call this morning is a career highlight — Steve has fought so hard for so many years, and it has been an honour be part of his fight for justice,” Commissioner Fuller said.

After 34 Years Portland Cold Case Detectives Solve 1982 Hate Crime Murder Of Gay Man.

Robbie Altmon Hate Crime Murder Solved After 34 Years

 

After 33 years the hate crime murder of Robbie Altom has finally been solved.

Alton was found beaten and unconscious in Portland Oregon back in November of 1982. He died three days later from blunt force head trauma. The family was skeptical that the case would ever be solved but just this past week, authorities announced that they have identified the killer

On Wednesday, Portland Police Bureau cold case homicide detectives announced they’ve identified Altom’s killer as Cecil Corrie Turner, who was 24 years old at the time of the murder.

Altom was killed because he was openly gay and death is what is now called a hate crime, said Det. Angela Hollan.

The original investigators learned a man was harassing Altom in the bar before he left.

The man used gay slurs and pushed Altom off a bar stool.

Turner was a person of interest during the initial investigation, but police did not have enough evidence to arrest him.

Cold case detectives recently spoke with a witness, who provided them with new information.

“Thirty-three years later she remembered some things she wasn’t really wasn’t willing to tell police back in 1982,” said Hollan. “I think there was a lot of fear about what might happen to her.”

That woman’s statements helped them determine Turner is “without a doubt” responsible for Altom’s death, said Hollan.

“Robbie was tired of being harassed and decided it was time to go home. Cecil followed Robbie outside the bar and this is what happened,” said Hollan.

My uncle Robbie was a good man,” she Altoms surviving niece. “He didn’t deserve to die because he was gay.” And added “But It’s just nice knowing that my uncle’s not in a box sitting in a warehouse somewhere with the words cold case written on him,” said Luna. “He’s not. It’s solved and now it’s put to rest.”

Corrie Turner, who was 24 years old at the time of the murder died in Oregon in 2009

NYPD Re-opens Investigation Into Transactivist Marsha P. Johnson’s Death 20+ Years Later

Transsexual activist Mariah Lopez has gotten the Manhattan D.A.’s office to assign someone to look more closely into the death of NYC icon and transgender activist Marsha P. Johnson whose body was found floating in the Hudson River off the West Village Piers shortly after the 1992 LGBT Pride March.

One of NYC’s best known and loved figures of the LGBT revolution Johnson was a leader in clashes with the police amid the Stonewall Riots  and was a co-founder, along with Sylvia Rivera, of Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (S.T.A.R.) in the early 1970s. She also was the “mother” of S.T.A.R. House along with Sylvia, getting together food and clothing to help support transgender  youth and lesbian and gay kids both living in the house on the lower East Side of New York and at the piers on the Westside highway.

Police originally ruled Marsha Johnsons death a suicide. But  Johnson’s friends and supporters said she was not suicidal, and a people’s postering campaign later declared that Johnson had earlier been harassed near the spot where her body was found.

Attempts to get the police to investigate the cause of death were unsuccessful until now 21 years later.

Ms. Lopez is also pushing for a permanent tribute statue of Marsha P Johnson  by the Christopher Pier which would be a wonderful homage to one of NYC’s first and most loved Stonewall era icons.

H/T Queerty