Tag Archives: Suicide Prevention

LGBT Suicide Hotlines Call Volume Rises After Trump Win – Resource List

LGBT Suicide Hotlines Call Volume Rises After Trump Win - Resource List

LGBT suicide prevention and help hotlines are reporting that calls to their services have spiked since Donald Trump was elected president.

Trans Hotline, a nonprofit that focuses on suicide prevention for transgender people, has received at least five times the call volume it normally gets. And the Trevor Project, the nation’s only LGBT youth-focused suicide prevention hotline, received more calls, texts, and online chats on Wednesday than it’s gotten on a single day in four years, more than double its normal daily volume.

Callers expressed fear that many of the gains in LGBT rights made under the Obama administration—like access to trans-related health care—will be lost under Trump said Gretta Martela, director of Trans Hotline.

Callers expressed fear that many of the gains in LGBT rights made under the Obama administration—like access to trans-related health care—will be lost under Trump, Martela said. Medical experts have said that access to appropriate hormones and other treatments for gender dysphoria can be essential to a transgender person’s physical and mental health. “The Republicans are looking to repeal Obamacare,” Martela said. “So a lot of people are looking at losing their health care coverage.”

Steve Mendelsohn, deputy executive director of the Trevor Project, said queer youth who contacted his hotline shared similar concerns. “Ninety-five percent of them tell us that they’re worried about the election results,” he said. “And they’re telling us that they’re feeling anxious and scared…They talk about things that came up during the election campaign. So a fear that perhaps gay marriage will be reversed. Or that conversion therapy will be promoted. Or that their insurance might be taken away.”

Nearly 30 percent of lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth have attempted suicide, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, compared with less than 7 percent of straight youth.

No matter what your age, sexual orientation, or gender identity.  PLEASE reach out if you need help or are feeling depressed.

  • Gay & Lesbian National Support: 1-888-THE-GLNH (843-4564)
  • Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender (GLBT) Youth Support Line: 1-800-850-8078
  • National Hotline for Gay, Lesbian, Bi and Transgendered Youth: 1-800-347-8336
  • PRIDE Institute for Lesbian and Gay Mental Health: 1-800-547-7433)
  • LGBT Hate Crime Hotline: 1-800-616-HATE (4283)
  • Suicide Hotline: 1-800-SUICIDE (2433)
  • National Suicide Prevention Helpline: 1-800-273-TALK (8245)
  • International Suicide Hotline List
  • The Trevor Project: 866-488-7386
  • Crisis Call Center: 1-800-273-8255
  • Depression Hotline: 1-630-482-9696
  • Suicide Crisis Line: 1-800-999-9999

CHAT ROOMS

Rutgers University To Honor Tyler Clementi’s Memory

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We must do all that we can to ensure that those that are the causalities of bullying are never forgotten. And Rutgers University is doing just that. The prestigious school is honoring the memory of bullying victim Tyler Clementi who took his life after a senseless prank was set up by his dormmates. Here’s more from HuffPostGay:

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. — Rutgers University is announcing a center named for the student who killed himself after his roommate used a webcam to see him kissing a man.

The university says the Tyler Clementi Center will build programs to help people transition to college. It will also offer lectures and training on social media, youth suicide, bullying and other topics.

The center is a collaboration with the Tyler Clementi Foundation, begun by the student’s parents.

The 18-year-old killed himself in September 2010, just weeks into his first year at Rutgers. His death sparked a national conversation about the treatment of young gays.

Roommate Dharun Ravi (dah-ROON’ RAH’-vee) was convicted last year of invasion of privacy, bias intimidation and other counts and served less than a month in jail. He is appealing his conviction.

Let’s hope that this new foundation helps those that have been victimized that there is hope and to not give up.

Is The Community Doing Enough To Prevent LGBT Suicides?

Is the community doing enough when LGBT are in distress? Have we done enough education and prevention to help stop horrible tragedies like Tyler Clementi and others that have committed suicide? It’s a question that is still prevalent in our community. An epidemic that over the past few years have plagued the LGBT community.

Here are the recent statistics from the Surgeon General detailing the likelihood of LGBT to attempt suicide:

Studies over the last four decades suggest that LGBT individuals may have an elevated risk for suicide ideation and attempts.–Thus, it is not known whether LGBT people die by suicide at higher rates than comparable heterosexual people.

Across many diferent countries, a strong and consistent relationship between sexual orientation and nonfatal suicidal behavior has been observed.A meta-analysis of 25 international population-based studies found the lifetime prevalence of suicide attempts in gay and bisexual male adolescents and adults was four times that of comparable heterosexual males. Lifetime suicide attempt rates among lesbian and bisexual females were almost twice those of heterosexual females. Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) adolescents and adults were also found to be almost twice as likely as heterosexuals to report a suicide attempt in the past year.

A later meta-analysis of adolescent studies concluded that LGB youth were three times more likely to report a lifetime suicide attempt than heterosexual youth, and four times as likely to make a medically serious attempt. Across studies, 12 to 19 percent of LGB adults report making a suicide attempt, compared with less than 5 percent of all U.S. adults; and at least 30 percent of LGB adolescents report attempts, compared with 8 to 10 percent of all adolescents. To date, population-based studies have not identiied transgender participants, but numerous nonrandom surveys show high rates of suicidal behavior in that population, with 41 percent of adult respondents to the 2009 National Transgender Discrimination Survey reporting lifetime suicide attempts.

It’s still happening and highly prevalent in our community. This is why advocacy is so important. We cannot afford to be complacent. Often, most of us may not know what to say or do. And when we don’t we have to be aware of the organizations that can help.

Are we doing more in the continuing epidemic? Of course we are. We have organizations like The Trevor Project and Hetrick-Martin Institute that tirelessly work with xrisis intervention and suicide prevention. Also ItGetsBetter that inspires and gives hope to LGBT youth. Organizations that weren’t available a decade ago or even a few years ago. But there is always more that needs to be done.  We need to always be aware.

Mormon Church Brings New Pamphlet for Families with LGBT Youth

I want you all to read this. Please keep this thought in mind, is this new Mormon Church acceptance a task to try and make Mitt Romney look more attractive towards the LGBT Community? I know this is a cynical thought to have but it’s a realistic one as well. We all know the Mormon Church is responsible for Prop 8 and also have more pull in this country than we’ll ever comprehend.

I am glad that they are trying to make a more accepting atmosphere for their youth, but what is the ultimate goal? Telling them that they’re okay now but they’ll need to marry the opposite sex and just suppress for the rest of their lives? This article is mostly about a great way to keep kids from committing suicide which is fantastic.

Let’s hear some thoughts on the subject! You know I love a good debate!

From the San Francisco Gate:

For more than a decade, the Family Acceptance Project (FAP) at SF State University has been studying the impact of family acceptance and rejection on the health, mental health and well-being of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) young people and developing research-based tools, resources and interventions to help diverse families support their LGBT children. This includes developing culturally and linguistically appropriate resources to prevent serious negative outcomes like suicide, HIV and homelessness and to promote well-being, and helping families balance deeply held values and beliefs with love for their LGBT children. The first of these faith-based family education resources – Supportive Families, Healthy Children: Helping Latter-day Saint Families with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Children – was published today by the Family Acceptance Project.

San Francisco, CA (PRWEB) June 16, 2012

FAMILY ACCEPTANCE PROJECT RELEASES FAMILY EDUCATION MATERIALS TO HELP MORMON FAMILIES SUPPORT THEIR LGBT CHILDREN
1st “BEST PRACTICE” RESOURCES FOR SUICIDE PREVENTION FOR LGBT MORMONS

For more than a decade, the Family Acceptance Project (FAP) at SF State University has been studying the impact of family acceptance and rejection on the health, mental health and well-being of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) young people and developing research-based tools, resources and interventions to help diverse families support their LGBT children. This includes developing culturally and linguistically appropriate resources to prevent serious negative outcomes like suicide, HIV and homelessness and to promote well-being, and helping families balance deeply held values and beliefs with love for their LGBT children. The first of these faith-based family education resources – Supportive Families, Healthy Children: Helping Latter-day Saint Families with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Children – was published today by the Family Acceptance Project.

One of the most challenging issues for many families is learning how to support their LGBT children in the context of religious and cultural values. The Family Acceptance Project has been working with families from a wide range of cultural and religious backgrounds to develop a series of family education materials based on FAP’s groundbreaking research which shows that family accepting and rejecting behaviors are linked with both serious health and mental health problems and well-being in young adulthood.

Written by FAP Director Dr. Caitlin Ryan, a clinical social worker with nearly 40 years of research and practice experience on LGBT health and mental health, and Dr. Bob Rees, a former Mormon Bishop who teaches Mormon Studies at Graduate Theological Union, this is the first research-based educational resource to help Mormon families support their LGBT children. As with other family education booklets from the Family Acceptance Project, Supportive Families, Healthy Children has been designated as the 1st “Best Practice” resource for suicide prevention for LGBT people by the national Best Practices Registry for Suicide Prevention and is the only such resource for Latter-day Saint (Mormon) families. The Best Practices Registry, coordinated by the Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC) and the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP), maintains an expert-reviewed compendium of approved “best practices” to prevent suicide that address specific aims of the national suicide prevention plan and have met objective review criteria.

Said, Dr. Caitlin Ryan, Director of the Family Acceptance Project: “Many parents and families think they have to choose between a gay child and their deeply held beliefs – a choice no parent should ever have to make. We wrote this booklet to show Mormon families what our compelling research has found – how families react to their LGBT children really matters. This booklet provides critical, specific information on how to support LGBT children and youth, how to build their self-esteem and well-being, reduce their risk for suicide, substance abuse, HIV and homelessness and keep their faith. Our hope is that every Mormon parent, bishop, and religious leader reads it and uses it.”

Dr. Robert Rees, co-author, educator and former Mormon bishop, noted: “Supportive Families, Healthy Children will save lives, keep families together and give Church leaders a resource for helping families support their LGBT sons, daughters and other family members. This booklet and the research that supports it mark the dawning of a brighter day for Latter-day Saint families and congregations.”

The newly-released version of Supportive Families, Healthy Children for Latter-day Saint families is available for download on the FAP website at: familyproject.sfsu.edu/publications Printed copies are available for distribution from the Family Acceptance Project in orders of any size. FAP provides guidance and training on using these materials and FAP’s research-based supportive family intervention model and other resources and tools. Contact fap(at)sfsu(dot)edu to obtain printed versions and for information on consultation and training.

Information on Supportive Families, Healthy Children’s “Best Practice” designation for suicide prevention is available on the Best Practices Registry’s webpage hosted by the Suicide Prevention Resource Center at www.sprc.org .

About the Family Acceptance Project

The Family Acceptance Project is a research, intervention, education and policy initiative that is designed to: 1) improve the health, mental health, and well-being of LGBT children and adolescents; 2) strengthen and help ethnically and religiously diverse families to support their LGBT children; 3) help LGBT youth stay in their homes to prevent homelessness and the need for custodial care in the foster care and juvenile justice systems; 4) inform public policy and family policy; and 5) develop a new evidence-based, family model of wellness, prevention, and care to promote well-being and decrease risk for LGBT youth. For more information, please visit: familyproject.sfsu.edu/