Tag Archives: LGBT

Federal Judge Rules Against LGBT YouTuber Content Creators In 'Censorship' Lawsuit

Federal Judge Rules Against LGBT YouTuber Content Creators In ‘Censorship’ Lawsuit

A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit by lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender YouTube content creators who said the company violated their First Amendment rights by “censoring” their clips.

In a decision issued Wednesday, U.S. District Court Magistrate Virginia DeMarchi in San Jose ruled that Google and YouTube are “private entities,” as opposed to government officials, and therefore are not bound by the First Amendment’s prohibition against restricting speech. “Plaintiffs do not state a claim … for violation of the First Amendment because defendants are not state actors,” – Judge Virginia DeMarchi

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The lawsuit brought by the  Divino Group — which distributes GNews! via YouTube — and other LGBT content creators. claimed that YouTube “censored” them by preventing ads from running in some of their videos, placing age restrictions on clips, and tagging other clips with a “restricted mode” aka “mature” audiences designation.

Judge DeMarchi dismissed the claim that Google violated the users’ free speech rights with prejudice — meaning that Divino and the others can’t redraft their complaint and bring that claim again citing a ruling that a federal appellate court sided with Google last year, in a similar lawsuit brought by the anti-LGBT Prager University.

Back2Stonewall.com Saturday Night Gay Short Film - "Signage" (12:00)

Back2Stonewall.com Saturday Night Gay Short Film – “Signage” (12:00)

Written and Directed by Rick Hammerly,  Signage follows two forty-ish gay friends who go out for a night at the clubs. Our hero connects with a young gay deaf man and they both hit it off.  But the many labels and groups within groups of the gay community might be a hurdle in their getting together.

Starring:  Rick Hammerly, Jason Wittig, Jeffery Johnson.

Signage won Best Short at the Washington DC Independent Film Fest.

*Portions of film is told in sign language, with subtitles.

World’s First LGBT Cryptocurrency,"Maricoin" To Enter Crowded Market

World’s First LGBT Cryptocurrency,”Maricoin” To Enter Crowded Market

Maricoin, the world’s first LGBT+ cryptocurrency, officially launched last Friday in a week-long pilot test in an LGBT+ neighborhood in Madrid, Spain.  A total of 25 commercial establishments, spread across Spain’s major towns, are already planning to adopt it in concept with more planning to join upon the currencies official release.

Hair stylist and entrepreneur, Juan Belmont who came up with the idea said  he “had to do something” to use the LGBT+ community’s economic clout in the fight against homophobia. “It would give us power in this globalized and capitalist world,” said Belmonte. “We will be able to assist those who currently lack the same legal protections as we do.”

According to Maricoin’s Chief Executive Francisco Alvarez, there are already 8,000 people waiting to buy the cryptocurrency before it starts trading. Backed by Miami-based venture capital firm Borderless Capital, the initiative aims to have Maricoin be used as payment in establishments that will sign an “equality manifesto.” The said manifesto basically defends the rights of LGBT+ people and “everyone suffering from exclusion, and advocates a “social, ethical, transversal and transparent economy.”

The short-term goal of this digital token initiative is to raise $1 million; this money is supposedly going to be utilized to fund Gay Pride Day in 2022. This digital currency’s creators guarantee that all monies make from this token will be put to good use in the community.

Maricoin’s name, is derived from a homophobic slur in Spanish, is a play on words that some may find offensive.

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Gay History – January 2, 1857: Martha Carey Thomas Feminist Lesbian Educator and Suffragist Born

Martha Carey Thomas was born in Baltimore, Maryland January 2, 1857.

Thomas an American educator and suffragist went on to become the dean and later president of Bryn Mawr University.

Growing up, Thomas was strongly influenced by the staunch feminism of her mother and her mother’s sister Hannah Whitall Smith who became a prominent preacher in their Quaker religion. Her father, a physician, was not completely happy with feminist ideas, but his daughter was fiercely independent and he supported her in all of her independent endeavors. Though both her parents were orthodox members of the Society of Friends, Thomas’ education and European travel led her to question those beliefs and develop a love for music and theater, both of which were forbidden to Orthodox Quakers.

Thomas went to Sage College, a women’s school at Cornell University.

She graduated from Cornell University in 1877.  Cornell offered her both the position of professor of literature and dean of Sage College, but she did not consider either.

She did graduate work in Greek at Johns Hopkins University but withdrew because she was not permitted to attend classes. She did further graduate work at the University of Leipzig, but that university did not grant degrees to women. She then went to the University of Zurich and earned a Ph.D. in linguistics, summa cum laude, in 1882 for her dissertation which was a philological analysis of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. This dissertation continued to be highly regarded by specialists eighty years later.She was the first woman and the first foreigner to receive such a doctorate from the university. She then spent some time in Paris, where she attended lectures by Gaston Paris at the Sorbonne, and then went back home to the United States.

In 1882, Thomas wrote a letter to the trustees of Bryn Mawr College, requesting that she be made president of the university. However, she was not granted the position as the trustee were concerned about her relative youth and lack of experience.  Instead, Thomas entered in 1884 as the dean of the college and chair of English.

In 1885 Thomas, together with Mary Elizabeth Garrett, Mamie Gwinn, Elizabeth King, and Julia Rogers, founded The Bryn Mawr School in Baltimore Maryland. The school would produce well-educated young women who met the very high entrance standards of Bryn Mawr College.

In 1908, she became the first president of the National College Women’s Equal Suffrage League. She was also a leading member of the National American Woman Suffrage Association. After 1920 she advocated the policies of the National Woman’s Party. She was one of the early promoters of an equal rights amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

Thomas lived for many years in a relationship with Mamie Gwinn.  After Gwinn left Thomas in 1904 to marry (a love triangle fictionalized in Gertrude Stein’s Fernhurst), Thomas started another relationship with Mary Garrett they shared the campus home, living together until Garrett’s death. Miss Garrett, who had been prominent in suffrage work and a benefactor of Bryn Mawr, left Martha $15,000,000 to be disposed of as she saw fit.

Thomas retired in 1922, at age sixty-five. The Bryn Mawr Summer School for Women Workers, which was founded at Carey’s behest in 1921, was a sort of “grand finale”  bookending Thomas’ legacy as an earlier shaper of the college.  Thomas, spent the last two decades of her life traveling the world in luxury, including trips to India, the Sahara, and France.

Martha Carey Thomas died in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, of a coronary occlusion. She had returned to the city to address Bryn Mawr College on the fiftieth anniversary of its founding. Her ashes were scattered on the Bryn Mawr College campus in the cloisters of the Thomas Library.

Today in Gay History – January 1st: Hoover, Haines, Orton, and Sodomy Laws Fall Over The Years

 

Hold on tight………..

January 1, 1801 – Ireland was added to Great Britain by an Act of Union thus creating the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. It also put Ireland, and today, Northern Ireland under British laws on morality and particularly homosexuality.

January 1, 1879 – E. M. Forster (1879 – 1970) is born in London. After his brilliant novel “A Passage to India” in 1924, he produced no new works. His gay novel “Maurice” was written in 1914, but not published until after his death. For 50 years his lover was a married London policeman named Bob Buckingham.

January 1, 1886 – English Criminal Law Amendment Act, 1885 takes effect. “Indecencies” between adult males in private become a crime punishable by up to two years imprisonment.

January 1, 1892 – Ellis Island in New York harbor opened. Over 20 million new arrivals to America were processed until its closing in 1954. It is unknown how many of the new immigrants were gays and lesbians. Some estimates are as high as 1 million (This is lower than 10% since most of those admitted to the US were families not that THAT really makes a difference.)

January 1, 1895 – J. Edgar Hoover is born in Washington. Hoover led a deeply repressed sexual life, living with his mother until he was 40, awkwardly rejecting the attention of women and pouring his emotional, and at times, physical attention on his handsome deputy at the FBI.  What exactly was his relationship with his ever constant companion and fellow FBI man Clyde Tolson? There has been a lot of speculation but no documentation. Still there are numerous stories of Hoover appearing in drag in New York. Usually in a red dress, and he liked to be called “Mary”.

January 1, 1900 – Silent movie star William Haines is born in Staunton, Virginia. His good looks and baby face made him a hit playing the wisecracking penniless young man in countless films. Blessed with a good voice, he was one of the few silent stars to make the transition to talkies.

In 1933, Haines was arrested in a YMCA with a sailor he had picked up in Los Angeles’ Pershing Square. Louis B. Mayer, the studio head at MGM, delivered an ultimatum to Haines: Choose between a sham marriage (also known as a “lavender marriage”) or his relationship with Shields. Haines chose Shields and they remained together for almost 50 years.  Mayer subsequently fired Haines and terminated his contract.  He made a few minor films at Poverty Row studios, then retired from acting. His final films were made with Mascot Pictures, Young and Beautiful and The Marines Are Coming in 1934.

Haines never returned to acting, but continued to receive offers for film roles. During production of Sunset Boulevard (1950), Haines was offered a cameo role in the film, which he declined. He later said, “It’s a rather pleasant feeling of being away from pictures and being part of them because all my friends are. I can see the nice side of them without seeing the ugly side of the studios.

Haines started a successful interior design business with his life partner Jimmie Shields, and was supported by friends in Hollywood most notably Joan Crawford.

Haines died of lung cancer in December 1973 at the age of 73.

January 1, 1901 – The Commonwealth of Australia was founded as six former British colonies became six states with Edmund Barton as the first prime minister, and Canberra as the capital. Today, Sydney, the biggest city in Australia, has one of the world’s largest gay communities. It’s annual Mardi Gras celebrations draw nearly a million a people from all over the globe.

January 1, 1933 – John Kingsley was born in Leicester, England. Writing under the name Joe Orton he became of Britain’s most popular comic playwrights (Entertaining Mr Sloane in 1964 and Loot in 1966). He was murdered by his lover Kenneth Halliwell who then committed suicide in the London flat they had occupied for 15 years. In 1967 he had written in his diary “I have high hopes of dying in my prime.”  (Orton documentary embedded below.)

January 1, 1959 – Fidel Castro seized power in Cuba after leading a revolution that drove out dictator Fulgencio Batista. Castro then established a Communist dictatorship. Although homosexuality was illegal under the Batista government the laws were largely ignored in fun loving Cuba. Since Castro, tens of thousands of gays have been rounded up and imprisoned.

January 1, 1971 – Colorado decriminalizes private consensual adult homosexual acts.

January 1, 1971 – Oregon decriminalizes private consensual adult homosexual acts.

January 1, 1972 – Science magazine publishes a report that suggests male homosexuality may be determined in the womb due to chemical and/or hormonal stress of the pregnant woman.

January 1, 1972 – Hawaii decriminalizes private consensual adult homosexual acts.

January 1, 1974 – Ohio repeals its sodomy laws and decriminalizes private consensual adult homosexual acts.

January 1, 1975 – New Mexico decriminalizes private consensual adult homosexual acts.

January 1, 1976 – Iowa decriminalizes private consensual adult homosexual acts.

January 1, 1977 – Vermont decriminalizes private consensual adult homosexual acts.

January 1, 1978 – Good Housekeeping readers name Anita Bryant “The Most Admired Woman in America.”

January 1, 1978 – North Dakota decriminalizes private consensual adult homosexual acts.

January 1, 1980 – Arizona decriminalizes private consensual adult homosexual acts.

WATCH:  A Genius Like Us: A Portrait of Joe Orton, a 70-minute BBC Arena documentary from 1982.