Tag Archives: gay

Watch: The Classic PBS ¿Qué Pasa, U.S.A.? - "Is Joe Gay?" Episode - [VIDEOWATCH: The Classic PBS ¿Qué Pasa, U.S.A.? "Is Joe Gay?" Episode - [VIDE

WATCH: The Classic PBS ¿Qué Pasa, U.S.A.? “Is Joe Gay?” Episode – [VIDEO]

¿Qué Pasa, U.S.A.? is America’s first bilingual situation comedy, which ran from 1977-1980 and the first sitcom to be produced for PBS.. The program explored the trials and tribulations faced by the Peñas, a Cuban-American family living in Miami’s Little Havana neighborhood, as they struggled to cope with a new country. Along the way the sitcom tackled pressing social issues such as homophobia, addiction, women’s liberation, and sexual freedom.

The “Is Joe Gay?” episode was filmed in 1980 and is as relevant today as it was then.

Happy HomoDays! – The Pansy Division’s “Homo Christmas!” (1995) NWSF Lyrics

The Pansy Division is/was a gay punk rock band that formed in San Francisco, California in 1991 one of the more melodic-oriented bands to emerge from the “queercore” movement that began in the 1980s recording such queercore punks songs which include Nine Inch Males, James Bondage, and “Dirty Queers Don’t Come Cheap”

The band released its last  vinyl 7″ of “Average Men,”  in February 2009

Happy HomoDays! – WATCH: The Liberace Christmas Special (1954) – VIDEO

There can be only one thing that as merry and GAYER than Christmas. LIBERACE!

There really isn’t much written about this Liberace television show episode other than the fact that its called: Liberace Christmas. 

But it’s oh so festive and very very very GAY! (Even though Liberace was claiming to be “straight” at the time.)

You just know that Lee the old gal, was probably decking his halls with the balls of a few stage hands.

Fa la la la la la la la la la!

Enjoy! 

Gay History - December 15, 1973: American Psychiatric Association Vote That Being Gay IS NOT A Mental Illness

Gay History – December 15, 1973: American Psychiatric Association Vote That Being Gay IS NOT A Mental Illness.

Forty-nine years ago today, the American Psychiatric Association made history by issuing a resolution stating that homosexuality was not a mental illness or sickness.

The board of the American Psychiatric Association unanimously votes to change the classification of homosexuality and removes it from the “Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.” This followed three years of pressure from gay liberation movement. The board bases this decision on its finding that most lesbians and gay men are clearly satisfied with their sexual orientation and show no signs of mental illness. The APA declares that “by itself, homosexuality does not meet the criteria for being a psychiatric disorder.”

Classified as a mental illness thousands of gays and lesbians were committed to mental institutions and suffered horrible torture and indignities such as: lobotomies, electric shock torture, and aversion therapy. These practiced did not stop after the APA’s resolution but certainly slowed it until it was spotlighted as the torture it actually is.

Continue reading Gay History – December 15, 1973: American Psychiatric Association Vote That Being Gay IS NOT A Mental Illness.

Happy HomoDays! – WATCH: The Judy Garland Christmas Special (1963) – FULL VIDEO

Its that time of year again as we enjoy the very merry festivities and joy of the holidays with the our beloved REAL gay icon Judy Garland in this 1963 Christmas television classic. (TV commercials included for that little extra nostalgic kick.)

Judy is joined  by Jack Jones, her daughters Liza Minnelli (Long before the Z) , Lorna Luft, and also, Mel Torme and Tracy Everitt.

Brought to you by Contact.

HARK THE HERALD JUDY SINGS! 

THANKSGIVING Gay History: Gay Pilgrims In 1600's Plymouth MA

THANKSGIVING Gay History: Gay Pilgrims In 1600’s Plymouth MA

In the summer of 1637, two working men at the English colony at Plymouth faced the possibility of execution if they were convicted of what the Puritans was said to be a grave moral crime.

Pilgrims John Alexander and Thomas Roberts had been caught in a homosexual relationship.

Plimoth Plantation Museum in Plymouth Massachusetts have discovered court records from their case, and from a handful of others to piece together the lives of the colony’s and America’s earliest gay and lesbian settlers.

“Plimoth Plantation as a museum has always been a place that has tried to recover every life,’’ said Richard Pickering, the museum’s deputy director. Pickering quoted the poet and author Paul Monette, who wrote that most of gay history “lies in shallow bachelors’ graves.’’

“We’re telling the audience that we’re going to talk about all those uncles and all those aunts who have fallen off the family tree,’’ said Pickering. “Their stories may be lost, so let’s contemplate those lost lives.’’ Though the historical record is sparse, “we can get a sense of what the options of the past were,’’ and provide some sense of history to a modern gay community “that really doesn’t have a strong sense of its past much before 1960.’’

Plimoth Plantation began researching the gay history of the colony about 15 years ago, in preparation for bringing its replica of the Pilgrim ship Mayflower to gay-friendly Provincetown.

Through the records were scant the prosecution of Alexander and Roberts for homosexual conduct reveals layers of complexities in the pilgrim life. Though the maximum penalty was death, neither man was executed.  Alexander, who was perceived as the seducer and therefore was considered more responsible, was branded with a hot iron and banished from the colony, Roberts was allowed to stay, though the colony forbade him from owning land or participating in the political process.

“At first glance you would think that 17th-century New Englanders would be very harsh,’’ said Pickering. But both men were spared execution, and in time Roberts was allowed to own land and to vote. “Even though there are statutes, in the enactment of the law they are much more gentle.’’ It may have been that the colony needed every pair of hands and couldn’t afford to lose both workers, or that in a tiny community of a few hundred, the judges would have known the defendants personally and would have been reluctant to send neighbors to their deaths.  (But some did try.)

Happy Thanksgiving

Back2Stonewall.com

The Nazification of America has reached the Kristallnacht phase. PLEASE BE CAREFUL. Tulsa Fire investigators are looking for a person of interest after someone smashed a window at a Brookside donut shop and threw a Molotov cocktail inside. This is the second time the business has been vandalized in the past two weeks.

OKLAHOMA Donut Shop Firebombed After Drag Event

Tulsa’s ABC affiliate:

Tulsa Fire investigators are looking for a person of interest after someone smashed a window at a Brookside donut shop and threw a Molotov cocktail inside. This is the second time the business has been vandalized in the past two weeks. The owners of The Donut Hole near 31st and Peoria said they were out of town when they got the devastating call that their business had been targeted again. Investigators said the person first puts a letter with anti-LGBTQ rhetoric on the door of a neighboring business, then uses a bat to smash through the glass door. Once it was broken, the person is seen throwing the explosive device inside.

The Nazification of America has reached the Kristallnacht phase.

PLEASE BE CAREFUL.

Gay History – October 23: Almost Forgotten Gay Activist Harry Hay and Quebec’s Gay Club Raid Protests

October 23.

1766: Christoffel Bosch van Leeuwarden, a seventy year old porter in the Netherlands, was convicted of seduction to sodomy and sentenced to three years of prison labor.

1977: Two thousand people demonstrated in downtown Montreal to protest October 22 bar raids. Police attack the demonstrators with motorcycles and billy-clubs and made further arrests.

Truxx and another bar, Le Mystique, were simultaneously raided on Oct. 22, 1977. Fifty police officers wearing bulletproof vests and carrying machine guns conducted the raid, charging 146 patrons as “found-ins” and Truxx’s owner as a keeper of a common bawdy house. Detainees were held for eight hours in crowded cells, subjected to venereal disease testing and denied the opportunity to call their lawyers.

Community response to the raid was quick. The night after the raid, two thousand people blocked a downtown intersection in protest. When police tried to break it up by driving their motorcycles into the crowd and clubbing people, protesters threw beer bottles. Hundreds turned up at a public forum, organized by l’Association pour les droits des gaies du Québec, and a defence committee for the found-ins was formed.

It took five years for the charges against the Truxx patrons to be dropped.

1979: Former Winnipeg Free Press publisher Richard Malone pleads guilty to charges of buggery and obstructing justice. He is given a one-year sentence, following a “juvenile sex ring” investigation in February 1979.

1993: In Helena Montana the state supreme court ruled that “transvestitism” is not a sufficient reason to deny a father joint custody of his 3-year old child.

1998: The Los Angeles City council condemns the “Making Sense of Homosexuality” conference, organized by the National Association for Research and Therapy of Homosexuality, otherwise known as NARTH saying that claims of “curing” homosexuals creates an atmosphere that can lead to anti-gay violence.

1999:  Religious right leader Rev. Jerry Falwell and evangelical Christian supporters met with Rev. Mel White and gay Christians for an anti-violence forum.  Shockingly, it did not stop the violence.

2002:  Pioneering gay rights activist Harry Hay (photo above)  dies of lung cancer in hospice care.

A  founder and architect of the modern gay rights movement, in 1950 Hay and four others formed one of the nation’s first gay rights organizations the Mattachine Society. Hay’s believed in the cultural minority status of homosexuals which led him to take a stand against assimilation.

In June 1969, the Stonewall riots in New York marked a move toward a more radical and militant approach among gay rights activists; Hay however stated that “I wasn’t impressed by Stonewall, because of all the open gay projects we had done throughout the sixties in Los Angeles. As far as we were concerned, Stonewall meant that the East Coast was catching up.” The riot led to the emergence of the Gay Liberation Front (GLF), with Hay involving  himself in the early development of its Los Angeles chapter.  In December 1969. Hay was elected its first chairperson, organizing pickets of homophobic establishments, holding a one-day “Gay-In” in Griffith Park and “funky dances” at Troupers Hall to challenge the legal restrictions on same-sex dancing

“We pulled ugly green frog skin of heterosexual conformity over us, and that’s how we got through school with a full set of teeth,” Hay once explained. “We know how to live through their eyes. We can always play their games, but are we denying ourselves by doing this? If you’re going to carry the skin of conformity over you, you are going to suppress the beautiful prince or princess within you.”

Hay would later go onto help create the Radical Faeries whose first conference was held on Labor Day 1979. The term “Radical” was chosen to reflect both political extremity and the idea of “root” or “essence”, while the term “Faerie” was chosen in reference both to the immortal animistic spirits of European folklore and to the fact that “fairy” had become a pejorative slang term for gay men.

In the 1980s, Hay involved himself in an array of activist causes, campaigning against South African apartheid, Nicaragua’s Contras, and the death penalty while also joining the nuclear disarmament and pro-choice movements and becoming a vocal critic of the administrations of Presidents Ronald Reagan and George Bush.

Hay came to be viewed as an elder statesman within the gay community, and was regularly invited to give speeches to LGBT activist and student groups. He was the featured speaker at the San Francisco Gay Pride Parade in 1982, and Grand Marshal of the Long Beach Gay Pride Parade in 1986. In 1989, West Hollywood city council awarded him an honor for his years of activism while that year he was invited to give a lecture at the Sorbonne in Paris, France, which he turned down.

Bit in 1983 Hay courted controversy. 

He remained highly critical of the mainstream gay rights movement and joined several other early gay rights activists in protesting the exclusion of the North American Man/Boy Love Association (NAMBLA) from participation in on the grounds that such exclusions pandered to heterosexual-dominated society.  NAMBLA had marched in the previous Pride parades. But morality was changing.  In a New York University forum, he remarked “If the parents and friends of gays are truly friends of gays, they would know from their gay kids that the relationship with an older man is precisely what thirteen-, fourteen-, and fifteen-year-old kids need more than anything else in the world”, highlighting his own relationship with an adult man when he was .  At the 1986 Los Angeles Gay Pride Parade he courted controversy by carrying a banner with “NAMBLA Walks With Me” written on it, after organizers banned the group from joining the march and organizers complained to police and Hay narrowly avoided arrest.  These events overshadowed Hay’s previous legacy so much that today he is all but forgotten and purposely left out of many LGBT historical writings.

Hay refused to participate in the official Heritage of Pride 1994 Pride Parade in New York City commemorating the 25th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots because of its exclusionary policies. Instead he joined an alternate parade called “The Spirit of Stonewall”.  As late as 2000 Hay continued to speak out against assimilation, saying, “The assimilationist movement is running us into the ground.”

Harry Hay passed away on October 24, 2002 at age 90. His ashes, mingled with those of his partner John Burnside, were scattered in the Nomenus Faerie Sanctuary, Wolf Creek, Oregon

THIS is our history.

Don’t forget it.