Tag Archives: Gary Gates

New Gallop Poll Shows That Anti-Gay Countries Are Not Good Places For Gays To Live. Duh!

WTF

 

Gallop is at it again trying its inept hands at LGBT polling.  And boy is this one a doozey.

Gallop reports that nearly 3 in 10 adults (28%) across 123 countries have responded in a new and most probably worthless poll that their city or area is a “good place” for gay or lesbian people to live, but hospitable attitudes range widely from as high as 83% in the Netherlands to as low as 1% in Pakistan and Senegal.

Meaning that LGBT’s shouldn’t live in anti-gay countries.

How brillant!

The Netherlands, where more than eight in 10 residents say their local communities are good places for gays or lesbians to live, was also the first country in the world to legalize same-sex marriage in 2001. As of 2013, Iceland (82%), Canada (80%), Spain (79%), the United Kingdom (77%), and Belgium (74%) had legalized gay marriage.

By contrast, in many of the countries where the residents are least likely to feel their city or area is a “good place,” it is illegal to be openly gay. For example, “an improper or unnatural act with a person of the same sex,” as Senegal’s anti-gay law dictates, can be punished with up to five years in prison and fines of up to $3,000. Laws that allow for the imprisonment of gay and lesbian people are also on the books in Pakistan — where 1% say their area is a good place for gay people to live — Uganda (2%), Ethiopia (2%), and Afghanistan (2%).

Of the countries or areas where residents are most likely to say their city or area is “not a good place” for gay and lesbian people, nearly all were African nations, where same-sex relationships are still largely taboo. This sentiment is nearly universal in Senegal (98%), Malawi (96%), Gabon (95%), Niger (95%), Mali (95%), and Uganda (95%). With passage of the Anti-Homosexuality Act in Uganda, for example, same-sex intimacy was punishable by life in prison. This, however, was recently struck down by a Ugandan court.

The perception that their local communities are not hospitable to gay and lesbian people is widely shared throughout the African sub-continent. South Africa may be the sole exception, with nearly half of the population (49%) saying their community is a good place for gay or lesbian people to live, but a slight majority (51%) says it is “not a good place.” This comes after the nation was the first and only in Africa to legalize same-sex marriage in 2006

“These latest findings show that for many lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) people around the world, being open about their sexual orientation or gender identity likely comes with substantial risk,” said controversial statistician Gary Gates, at the Williams Institute, whose recent surveys about LGBT population numbers has been widely disputed. “This helps to explain why legal and social change toward greater acceptance toward LGBT people can be so elusive in regions of the world like much of the African continent.

The global average and the country rankings do not include data from more than a dozen countries where the question is too sensitive to be asked: Egypt, Morocco, Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Iran, Nigeria, Bahrain, Bhutan, Iraq, Kuwait, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, and Yemen which right there if added to the mix would have skewed the numbers.  So not only was it a needless poll, its worthless to boot.

For methodology and specific survey dates, please review Gallup’s Country Data Set details.

But really why bother.

GALLUP Releases Another Seriously Flawed Poll Ranking America’s “Gayest States”

GALLUP along with Gary J. Gates of the Williams Institute, UCLA School of Law has issued the results of a poll conducted last year in which they asked over 200,000 people if they “personally identify” NOT OPENLY IDENTIFY as LGBT with surprising and INSANE results including states like Kentucky, South Dakota, and Arizona in the Top 15.

The percentage of U.S. adults who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) ranges from 1.7% in North Dakota to 5.1% in Hawaii and 10% in the District of Columbia, according to Gallup surveys conducted from June-December 2012. Residents in the District of Columbia were most likely to identify as LGBT (10%). Among states, the highest percentage was in Hawaii (5.1%) and the lowest in North Dakota (1.7%), but all states are within two percentage points of the nationwide average of 3.5%.

Measuring sexual orientation and gender identity can be challenging because these concepts involve complex social and cultural patterns. There are a number of ways to measure lesbian, gay, and bisexual orientation, and transgender status. Gallup chose a broad measure of personal identification as LGBT because this grouping of four statuses is commonly used in current American discourse, and as a result has important cultural and political significance.

One limitation of this approach is that it is not possible to separately consider differences among lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, or transgender individuals. A second limitation is that this approach measures broad self-identity, and does not measure sexual or other behavior, either past or present.

Interestingly both GALLUP and Gates go to great lengths to connect this to their previous serious flawed and dangerous survey/poll which stated that only 3.2 percent of Americans are gay and also backhandedly abiet, state that their polls might be nothing more than utter bullshit and wrong.

As was outlined in the first report of these data in October, measuring sexual orientation and gender identity can be challenging because these concepts involve complex social and cultural patterns. There are a number of ways to measure lesbian, gay, and bisexual orientation, and transgender status. Gallup chose a broad measure of personal identification as LGBT because this grouping of four statuses is commonly used in current American discourse, and as a result has important cultural and political significance. One limitation of this approach is that it is not possible to separately consider differences among lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, or transgender individuals. A second limitation is that this approach measures broad self-identity, and does not measure sexual or other behavior, either past or present.

Both GALLUP and Gates  rely on people “outing” themselves to a stranger (presumably on the phone) and will invariably miss a large percentage of actual gay folks.  Apart from the legitimate concerns for one’s safety, this completely ignores an individual’s own handling of their sexuality in a society and the results of these polls are  dangerous to the representation of the LGBT community.

Gates a gay man himself should be ashamed of himself for presenting such skewed information just to make a name for himself.  And  as for GALLUP?  I would expect nothing less from them since they presented a poll during the 2012 elections saying that the majority of American supported voting for  Mitt Romney as President.

Gallup