Actor Terry Crews Continues On About His “Sexual Assault” Grope: I felt “emasculated” and “objectified”

Will Kohler

Will Kohler is a noted LGBT historian, writer, blogger and owner of Back2Stonewall.com. A longtime gay activist, Will fought on the front lines of the AIDS epidemic with ACT-UP and continues fighting today for LGBT acceptance and full equality. Will’s work has been referenced in notable media venues as MSNBC and BBC News, The Washington Post, The Advocate, The Daily Beast, Hollywood Reporter, Raw Story, and The Huffington Post

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6 Responses

  1. Jim Steele says:

    Somebody needs a dish of kitty chow.

  2. Butch Goodwin says:

    I am sorry, like Will I find this a bit hard to swallow. (no pun intended). As I have posted previously. These situations I think are more fueled by “homophobia” rather than a true sexual intent. ie. The ass slapping /grabbing that goes on during male sports. Would those be deemed as sexual harassment in 20 years? In the cold light of hindsight will we have a rush to the psych offices for “PTSD”? Will that be the “NEW” defence tactic in criminal cases? ” I was groped by a team mate in the High School” locker room, that is why I shot the guy!”

    I seriously believe we are in the midst of a witch hunt. The like of that against Catholic Priests in the last decade. At the end of this “Golden” Rainbow is a pot of gold.

  3. Rick says:

    As someone who is gay and has been groped in a similar manner by a gay man without invitation, I mean this sincerely. Fuck you, dicksmack.

  4. Kyle says:

    I get what you’re saying. It is insulting that he “felt emasculated” just because he was the passive object of another man’s sexual advances. Factors at play are…homophobia and traditional gender roles. Good. Got it. But leave it at that.

    Because this article doesn’t have a grasp on the reality of sexual assault. We’re no longer in a Neanderthal age where resisting sexual assault is a matter of mere physicality. It’s a matter of power and social relations.

    It can’t be a surprise to anyone that sexual assault and rape happens within the queer community. Why was this article written? To make excuses for sexual assault (“poor sense of aim” and “boundaries were broken, yes” my ass!)? To mock the victim because he doesn’t look like a traditional victim?

    You reached for a point to make here, and maybe there was one, but you missed it by a mile. Maybe even two.

  1. November 18, 2017

    […] (Via Back2Stonewall) […]

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