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Gay History – WATCH: The Story Of “The Castro” FULL Documentary (Video)

 

As many of you know a lot of my history posts tend to lean more too New York gay history mostly because that is where I hail from.  That being said I would like to share with you a really interesting and great documentary I stumbled upon about the history of the Castro neighborhood in San Francisco.

Originally shown during the Gay and Lesbian Pride Month in 1996, The Castro is a 90-minute documentary tells the dramatic story of how a quiet corner of San Francisco became the cornerstone of a movement-an international symbol of gay liberation.

Using rare archival film and fresh contemporary footage, the story of the Castro’s transformation and history is told by the people who lived it: young and old, straight and gay. They bring to life a history ranging from the discriminatory world of the 1950s, through the flowering of “gay power,” and into the age of AIDS.

The Castro, was produced by KQED San Francisco/PBS  and won the George Foster Peabody Award, a CINE Golden Eagle Award and was   screened at numerous film festivals in the United States and abroad.

Its a must see for anyone interested in our history.

 

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Will Kohler

Will Kohler is a noted LGBT historian, journalist and owner of Back2Stonewall.com. A longtime gay activist, Will fought on the front lines of the AIDS epidemic with ACT-UP and continues fighting today for LGBT acceptance and full equality. Will’s work has been referenced in notable media venues as MSNBC and BBC News, The Washington Post, The Daily Beast, Hollywood Reporter, and Raw Story,

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1 thought on “Gay History – WATCH: The Story Of “The Castro” FULL Documentary (Video)”

  1. Wow, wow, wow. A superb documentary on the gay history of the Castro. Unfortunately, it is not that gay anymore, I am told. I visited San Francisco many times on business during the 1970s and 1980s, and hung out on Polk Street (THE gay street pre-Castro) and the Castro. I do remember seeing the affect of AIDS, around 1990, with far fewer guys walking around, and many with canes, compared with previous years.

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