Gay Man Killed in the San Bernardino Terrorist Attack Saved 4 People

Larry David Kaufman

Larry Daniel Kaufman, a gay man who was killed by Syed Farook and Tashfeen Malik while working at a coffee cart inside the Inland Regional Center for people with disabilities in San Bernardino is credited with saving the lives of 4 people, according to sources close to Ryan Reyes, Kaufman’s surviving partner.

Daniel was in the hallway of the facility as the shooting began. Daniel, more concerned about everyone around him than himself, was screaming “Get out! Go!  Get out now! Hurry!” He began pushing people out of harms way, urging them to the safety of the door before he was shot and killed.

Many of Daniel’s loved ones gathered at Irwindale, California’s Santa Fe Dam Recreation Area on Saturday for memorial service to remember Daniel.

His partner of three years, Reyes, retold Daniel’s favorite stories.  Daniel, he said, lived to make people laugh.  He loved to get that reaction from people.

Ryan Reyes has a special message he wants to send

“I speak for both Daniel and myself when I say that this attack should NOT encourage people to treat Muslims any differently than they would anyone else. This tragedy was committed by a radical group. The twisted actions and beliefs of a few should not be used to view the majority. Muslims are just as loving and caring as anyone else. It made Daniel sick and continues to make me sick, that Americans refuse to drop this way of thinking.”

 

Will Kohler

Will Kohler is a noted LGBT historian, writer, blogger and owner of Back2Stonewall.com. A longtime gay activist, Will fought on the front lines of the AIDS epidemic with ACT-UP and continues fighting today for LGBT acceptance and full equality. Will’s work has been referenced in notable media venues as MSNBC and BBC News, The Washington Post, The Advocate, The Daily Beast, Hollywood Reporter, Raw Story, and The Huffington Post

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2 Responses

  1. nanaheidi says:

    Bless you, Daniel. You are a hero whom I will long remember for your unselfish bravery last week. Daniel was a person with an enormous capacity for courage and for the care of others in the face of great personal danger. I long for the day when we don’t need to add the adjective “gay” or “black” any more than we say “blond” or “tall.” We are all of one family and Daniel reminded us of that by helping others in peril before helping himself.

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