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New Gallop Poll Shows That Anti-Gay Countries Are Not Good Places For Gays To Live. Duh!

WTF

 

Gallop is at it again trying its inept hands at LGBT polling.  And boy is this one a doozey.

Gallop reports that nearly 3 in 10 adults (28%) across 123 countries have responded in a new and most probably worthless poll that their city or area is a “good place” for gay or lesbian people to live, but hospitable attitudes range widely from as high as 83% in the Netherlands to as low as 1% in Pakistan and Senegal.

Meaning that LGBT’s shouldn’t live in anti-gay countries.

How brillant!

The Netherlands, where more than eight in 10 residents say their local communities are good places for gays or lesbians to live, was also the first country in the world to legalize same-sex marriage in 2001. As of 2013, Iceland (82%), Canada (80%), Spain (79%), the United Kingdom (77%), and Belgium (74%) had legalized gay marriage.

By contrast, in many of the countries where the residents are least likely to feel their city or area is a “good place,” it is illegal to be openly gay. For example, “an improper or unnatural act with a person of the same sex,” as Senegal’s anti-gay law dictates, can be punished with up to five years in prison and fines of up to $3,000. Laws that allow for the imprisonment of gay and lesbian people are also on the books in Pakistan — where 1% say their area is a good place for gay people to live — Uganda (2%), Ethiopia (2%), and Afghanistan (2%).

Of the countries or areas where residents are most likely to say their city or area is “not a good place” for gay and lesbian people, nearly all were African nations, where same-sex relationships are still largely taboo. This sentiment is nearly universal in Senegal (98%), Malawi (96%), Gabon (95%), Niger (95%), Mali (95%), and Uganda (95%). With passage of the Anti-Homosexuality Act in Uganda, for example, same-sex intimacy was punishable by life in prison. This, however, was recently struck down by a Ugandan court.

The perception that their local communities are not hospitable to gay and lesbian people is widely shared throughout the African sub-continent. South Africa may be the sole exception, with nearly half of the population (49%) saying their community is a good place for gay or lesbian people to live, but a slight majority (51%) says it is “not a good place.” This comes after the nation was the first and only in Africa to legalize same-sex marriage in 2006

“These latest findings show that for many lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) people around the world, being open about their sexual orientation or gender identity likely comes with substantial risk,” said controversial statistician Gary Gates, at the Williams Institute, whose recent surveys about LGBT population numbers has been widely disputed. “This helps to explain why legal and social change toward greater acceptance toward LGBT people can be so elusive in regions of the world like much of the African continent.

The global average and the country rankings do not include data from more than a dozen countries where the question is too sensitive to be asked: Egypt, Morocco, Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Iran, Nigeria, Bahrain, Bhutan, Iraq, Kuwait, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, and Yemen which right there if added to the mix would have skewed the numbers.  So not only was it a needless poll, its worthless to boot.

For methodology and specific survey dates, please review Gallup’s Country Data Set details.

But really why bother.

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Will Kohler

Will Kohler is a noted LGBT historian, journalist and owner of Back2Stonewall.com. A longtime gay activist, Will fought on the front lines of the AIDS epidemic with ACT-UP and continues fighting today for LGBT acceptance and full equality. Will’s work has been referenced in notable media venues as MSNBC and BBC News, The Washington Post, The Daily Beast, Hollywood Reporter, and Raw Story,

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